Mammals are a diverse range of animals of which there are 107 species found in and around the British Isles. A quarter of these are now at risk of extinction.  More research is urgently required to get a clearer picture of population trends so conservation can be effectively targeted. Watch this presentation where our member Jo Chesham will inform you on how you can help Britain’s wild mammals through learning how to identify different species, where to look for them, how to participate in citizen science and what you can do in your back garden and out and about.

British mammals are under threat nationwide. There are many small ways you can help conserve these special creatures.  Here are 10 top tips for further reading ideas and links:

  1. Join Cambridgeshire Mammal Group and learn skills in identifying mammals, surveying them and live trapping small mammals
  2. Become a Hedgehog Champion, help map hedgehog sightings and record hedgehog holes at Hedgehog Street
  3. Download the iRecord app and start spotting and recording all wildlife at home and out and about
  4. Download the Mammal Mapper app – use your frequent walks to record mammals you see, or one off sightings
  5. Learn more about natural history around Cambridge with the Cambridge Natural History Society
  6. Find out more about The Mammal Society – Plastics in mammals research and how it is impacting our mammals
  7. Use your camera trap/trail cam to record mammals in an exciting citizen science project
  8. Make your garden more wildlife friendly with these easy ideas from the RSPB and see how to help wildlife at home from the Wildlife Trust
  9. Join the Wildlife Gardening Forum, see and share ideas
  10. Help support our water vole population by reporting American Mink sightings to Waterlife Recovery East

Cambridgeshire Mammal Group

Cambridgeshire Mammal Group is an organisation made up entirely of volunteers who give up their time to benefit Cambridgeshire’s wild mammals.  Promoting the study, conservation and protection of local mammals we work to inform the public and stimulate interest in mammals.  Members are trained in mammal identification and surveying techniques, providing valuable biological records for the county helping to monitor population changes and threats to mammals.

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