Conservation Success Stories at the Museum of Zoology

University of Cambridge + Julieta Sarmiento Photography

Explore the Museum of Zoology with conservation experts and discover the wildlife conservation success stories behind the animals on display.

Journey with us from the Western Ghats in India to the Atlantic Ocean and also learn how our winged friends, both small and large are being helped. We’ll be hearing about we’re saving the following species which you can see for yourself in the Museum of Zoology:

  • Tiger conservation in the Western Ghats in India. Speakers: Mrunmayee, wildlife conservation practitioner from India and an MPhil CL student at the University of Cambridge; DV Girish, Managing Trustee, Bhadra Wildlife Conservation Trust; and Shreedev Hulikere, Managing Trustee, WildCAT-C.
  • Great Shearwater and the Marine Protection Area in the Atlantic. Speaker: Dr Mike Brooke, Strickland Curator of Ornithology, Museum of Zoology.
  • The reintroduction of the Large Blue Butterfly. Speaker: Matt Hayes, Research Assistant at the Museum of Zoology
  • Albatross conservation. Speakers: Rory Crawford and Stephanie Prince, RSPB, and Samantha Matjila, Namibia Nature Foundation

Premiered at 2pm, Sunday 28 March

Photo credit: University of Cambridge + Julieta Sarmiento Photography

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